Tag: Ven. William Van Gordon

The Spiritual Fence Sitter

The Spiritual Fence Sitter When people are practising a spiritual path it is normal that, to a certain extent, their interest and commitment to the path waxes and wanes. For example, they may feel fully on-board one day but then later during the same…

The World Through the Eyes of the Central Nervous System

The World Through the Eyes of the Central Nervous System An important principle of psychology is that of saltatory conduction through the nervous system. Saltatory conduction is not particularly difficult to understand and in the United Kingdom it is probably taught as part of…

Mindfulness for Treating Addiction: A Clinician’s Guide

Mindfulness for Treating Addiction: A Clinician’s Guide An aspect of our scientific work relating to mindfulness involves investigating its applications for treating addiction. In this respect, we have a longstanding collaboration with Dr. Mark Griffiths who is Professor of Behavioural Addiction at Nottingham Trent…

To Enlightenment and Beyond

To Enlightenment and Beyond Click here for Italian readers – Clicca qui per i lettori italiani Most Buddhist practice systems assert that there are various stages on the path to enlightenment. Perhaps the most well-documented example is the Ten Bodhisattva Bhūmis which in Mahayana Buddhism, are…

Mindfulness in Mental Health: A Critical Reflection

Mindfulness in Mental Health: A Critical Reflection We were recently invited to write a paper for the inaugural issue of the Journal of Psychology, Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Brain Stimulation. Our contribution (which was co-authored with our friend and colleague Professor Mark Griffiths) was entitled…

Should Mindfulness be Taught to the Military?

Should Mindfulness be Taught to the Military? A few months ago, we wrote a post on whether mindfulness should be used in military (and business) settings?  As we mentioned in our earlier post, the issue of using mindfulness in military settings is a reasonably…

Can a Buddha become Angry?

Can a Buddha become Angry?       Given that Buddhahood is frequently described as a state of limitless compassion that is completely free of negative and afflictive emotions, it might seem strange that we have decided to write a post addressing the question…

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