A Guided Meditation on Mindful Working

A Guided Meditation on Mindful Working

work mind 4

A particular arm of our research work at the moment is concerned with evaluating the utility of an eight-week secular (i.e., non-religious) mindfulness intervention we developed called Meditation Awareness Training (MAT). Part of our empirical work with MAT involves exploring its potential applications in the workplace setting. The version of MAT that we use in work-related contexts is still based on the original intervention protocol (that was primarily developed for use in clinical settings), but it has undergone a number of modifications. These modifications mostly relate to making the intervention more appealing to organisations who are more likely to support the introduction of mindfulness to their employees where it can be demonstrated that any benefits to psychological wellbeing resulting from participation in MAT also somehow improve overall work effectiveness. Consequently, the majority of mindfulness exercises taught in MAT specifically focus on how to cultivate and practice mindfulness whilst engaging in everyday work situations (e.g., working at the computer, attending meetings, speaking on the telephone, undertaking manual work, etc.). Today’s post features part of a guided mindfulness meditation that is used in week one of the eight-week MAT program in order to help introduce employees to the basic principles of breath awareness and to idea of practising mindfulness ‘on the job’.

Guided Mindfulness Meditation: Mindful Working

  1. Breathing in, when I am working, I remember that I am also breathing; breathing out, I remember to observe my breath as it enters and leaves the body.
  2. Breathing in, I notice whether my breath is deep or shallow, short or long; breathing out, I allow my breath to follow its natural course.
  3. Breathing in, I become fully aware of each individual moment of my breath; breathing out, I taste and experience the texture of breath.
  4. Breathing in, I am aware of my lungs as they rise and fall; breathing out, I am aware of my heart beat.
  5. Breathing in, when I am working, I am fully aware of my bodily posture and movements; breathing out, I remember to go calmly and gently.
  6. Breathing in, there is nowhere else I need to be; breathing out, I am already home.
  7. Breathing in, when I am working, I observe my feelings; breathing out, I cradle my feelings in awareness.
  8. Breathing in, when I am working, I observe the thoughts moving through my mind; breathing out, I allow my thoughts to come and go.
  9. Breathing in, I listen deeply to what others are saying and not saying; breathing out, I observe how these words influence my feelings and thoughts.
  10. Breathing in, I am here; breathing out, I am now.

 

 

Ven Edo Shonin & Ven William Van Gordon

Further Reading

Chapman M. Mindfulness in the workplace: what is the fuss all about? Counselling at Work. 2011; 74 (Autumn):20-24.

Chapman M. Where are we now? Counselling at Work. 2013; 82 (Autumn):4-9.

Dane E, Brummel BJ. Examining workplace mindfulness and its relations to job performance and turnover intention. Human Relations. 2014; 67:105-128.

Grégoire S, Lachance L. Evaluation of a brief mindfulness-based intervention to reduce psychological distress in the workplace. Mindfulness. 2014; DOI::10.1007/s12671-014-0328-9.

Malarkey WB, Jarjoura D, Klatt M. Workplace based mindfulness practice and inflammation: A randomized trial. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 2013; 27:145-154.

Shonin E, Van Gordon W Managers’ experiences of Meditation Awareness Training. Mindfulness. 2014; DOI: 10.1007/s12671-014-0334-y.

Shonin E, Van Gordon W, Dunn T, Singh N, Griffiths MD. Meditation Awareness Training for work-related wellbeing and job performance: A randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. 2014; DOI 10.1007/s11469-014-9513-2.

Shonin E, Van Gordon W, Griffiths MD. The treatment of workaholism with Meditation Awareness Training: A Case Study. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing. 2014; 10: 193-195.

Van Gordon W, Shonin E, Zangeneh M, Griffiths MD. Work-related mental health and job performance: Can mindfulness help? International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. 2014; 12:129-137.

A Guided Meditation on Loving-kindness and Compassion

A Guided Meditation on Loving-kindness and Compassion

present moment 3

In a recent post, we focussed on the practices of loving-kindness and compassion and discussed their role within Buddhism and within spiritual practice more generally. Following on from this post and further to several emails we have received requesting more information on these practices, here we provide a short introductory meditation on loving-kindness and compassion. This meditation is adapted from a guided meditation that we included in an article entitled ‘The psychotherapeutic applications of loving-kindness and compassion meditation’ that was recently accepted for publication in Thresholds (a journal of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy). The first part of this meditation focusses on establishing equanimity, calm, and meditative awareness, and the second part provides a gentle introduction to the practices of loving-kindness and compassion. There are many ways to practice this meditation, but our suggestion is that you adopt a suitable meditation posture, and then spend one or two minutes on each of the ten exercises.

An introductory meditation on loving-kindness and compassion

 

  1. Breathing in, I am fully aware I breathe in; Breathing out, I am fully aware I breathe out.
  2. Breathing in, I am aware whether my breath is deep or shallow, short or long; Breathing out, I allow my breath to follow its natural course.
  3. Breathing in, I am aware of the space and time that exists between my in-breath and out-breath, and between my out-breath and in-breath; Breathing out, I relax into this space and time.
  4. Breathing in, there is nowhere else I need to be; Breathing out, I am already home.
  5. Breathing in, I am here; Breathing out, I am now.
  6. Breathing in, I enjoy breathing in; Breathing out, I enjoy breathing out and I smile gently to myself.
  7. Breathing in, I am aware of the suffering that is present inside of me; Breathing out, I allow any difficult feelings to calm and relax.
  8. Breathing in, I cultivate feelings of joy and happiness; Breathing out, I bathe in those feelings of joy and happiness.
  9. Breathing in, I am aware that other people also suffer; Breathing out, I radiate feelings of joy and happiness to others.
  10. Breathing in, I return to simply following my breathing; Breathing out, I enjoy the experience of simply being.

 

 

Ven Edo Shonin & Ven William Van Gordon

Further Reading

Dalai Lama. (2001). Stages of meditation: training the mind for wisdom. London: Rider.

Gampopa. (1998). The Jewel Ornament of Liberation: The wish-fulfilling gem of the noble teachings. (A. K. Trinlay Chodron, Ed., & K. Konchong Gyaltsen, Trans.) New York: Snow Lion Publications.

Hutcherson CA, Seppala EM, Gross JJ. (2008). Loving-kindness meditation increases social connectedness. Emotion 8: 720-724.

Khyentse D. (2007). The heart of compassion: the thirty-seven verses on the practice of a Bodhisattva. Boston: Shambhala Publications.

Mascaro JS, Rilling JK, Negi LT, et al. (2012). Compassion meditation enhances empathic accuracy and related neural activity. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. DOI:10.1093/scan/nss095.

Shamay-Tsoory SG. (2011) The neural bases for empathy. Neuroscientist 17: 18-24.

Shonin E, Van Gordon W, Griffiths, MD. (2014). The psychotherapeutic applications of loving-kindness and compassion meditation. Thresholds: Journal of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, Spring Issue, In Press.

Shonin E, Van Gordon W, & Griffiths MD. (2014). The emerging role of Buddhism in clinical psychology: Towards effective integration. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, In Press.